Helpful Hints
  • (1) You can search the entire content of Dean’s by phrase or by individual words. Just type your keywords into the search box and then pull down the search icon on the right and choose the option you need: search by word or by phrase or reset the content.
  • (2) Double click on a word in the content of a definition, and if the word is listed as a keyword in Dean’s, it will look that word up.
  • (3) You can use the search function to help jump the scrolling function. Simply type the first 2-3 letters into the search box then hit enter on your keyboard and the scroll will go to those Keywords that begin with those letters and allow you to scroll from there.

A statutory classification based on race, national origin, or alienage making it subject to strict scrutiny examination under Equal Protection.


Several formulations might explain the Supreme Court’s treatment of certain classifications as 'suspect.' Some classifications are more likely than others to reflect deep-seated prejudice, rather than legislative rationality in pursuit of some legitimate objective. Legislation predicated on such prejudice is easily recognized as incompatible with the constitutional understanding that each person is to be judged individually and is entitled to equal justice under the law. Classifications treated as suspect tend to be irrelevant to any proper legislative goal. See McLaughlin v. Florida, 379 U. S. 184, 379 U. S. 192 (1964); Hirabayashi v. United States, 320 U. S. 81, 320 U. S. 100 (1943). Finally, certain groups, indeed largely the same groups, have historically been 'relegated to such a position of political powerlessness as to command extraordinary protection from the majoritarian political process.' San Antonio Independent School Dist. v. Rodriguez, 411 U. S. 1, 411 U. S. 28 (1973); Graham v. Richardson, 403 U. S. 365, 403 U. S. 372 (1971); see United States v. Carolene Products Co., 304 U. S. 144, 304 U. S. 152-153, ...

Register or login to access full content



Professors
Professionals
Students