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Parties may only appeal a 'final decision of a district court.' 28 U.S.C. § 1295 (2000). In Catlin v. United States, 324 U.S. 229, 233, 65 S.Ct. 631, 89 L.Ed. 911 (1945), the Supreme Court defined a final judgment as a decision by the district court that 'ends the litigation on the merits and leaves nothing for the court to do but execute the judgment.' See also Coopers & Lybrand v. Livesay, 437 U.S. 463, 467, 98 S.Ct. 2454, 57 L.Ed.2d 351 (1978). By requiring parties to 'raise all claims of error in a single appeal following final judgment on the merits,' Firestone Tire & Rubber Co. v. Risjord, 449 U.S. 368, 374, 101 S.Ct. 669, 66 L.Ed.2d 571 (1981), section 1295, like its counterpart section 1291, 'forbid[s] piecemeal disposition on appeal of what for practical purposes is a single controversy....' Cobbledick v. United States, 309 U.S. 323, 325, 60 S.Ct. 540, 84 L.Ed. 783 (1940). If a case is not fully adjudicated as to all claims for all parties and there is no express determination that there is no just reason for delay or express direction for entry of judgment as to fewer than ...

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