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n. That which causes fermentation, as yeast, barm, or fermenting beer. Ferments are of two kinds: (a) Formed or organized ferments. (b) Unorganized or structureless ferments. The latter are also called soluble or chemical ferments, and enzymes. Ferments of the first class are as a rule simple microscopic vegetable organisms, and the fermentations which they engender are due to their growth and development; as, the acetic ferment, the butyric ferment, etc. See Fermentation. Ferments of the second class, on the other hand, are chemical substances, as a rule soluble in glycerin and precipitated by alcohol. In action they are catalytic and, mainly, hydrolytic. Good examples are pepsin of the gastric juice, ptyalin of the salvia, and disease of malt. Intestine motion; heat; tumult; agitation. A gentle internal motion of the constituent parts of a fluid; fermentation. ferment oils, volatile oils produced by the fermentation of plants, and not originally contained in them. These were the quintessence’s of the alchemists.


 - vb. To cause ferment of fermentation in; to set in motion; to excite internal emotion in; to heat.


 - vb. To undergo fermentation; to be in motion, or to be excited into ...

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