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See Felony murder (inherently dangerous). There is no precise statutory definition for the second degree felony-murder rule. Penal Code section 189 provides in relevant part: 'All murder which is perpetrated by means of a destructive device or explosive, knowing use of ammunition designed primarily to penetrate metal or armor, poison, lying in wait, torture, or by any other kind of willful, deliberate, and premeditated killing, or which is committed in the perpetration of, or attempt to perpetrate, arson, rape, robbery, burglary, mayhem, or any act punishable under Section 288, is murder of the first degree; and all other kinds of murders are of the second degree.' 


In People v. Ford (1964) 60 Cal.2d 772, 795 [36 Cal.Rptr. 620, 388 P.2d 892], the court defined the doctrine as follows: 'A homicide that is a direct causal result of the commission of a felony inherently dangerous to human life (other than the six felonies enumerated in Pen. Code, § 189) constitutes at least second degree murder. [Citations.]' In determining whether the felony is inherently dangerous, 'we look to the elements of the felony in the abstract, not the particular 'facts' of the case.' (People v. Williams, supra, ...

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