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In Haggins, 715 F.2d at 1057 the court upheld the admission of statements by a four-year-old child made more than an hour after the incident but while the child was still suffering the trauma from it. Other cases have upheld the admission of statements that also were made after the startling event but well within the traumatic range of it. See, e.g., United States v. Baggett, 251 F.3d 1087, 1090 & n. 1 (6th Cir.2001) (applying the excited-utterance exception to statements made several hours after the last of several spousal beatings over a three-day period); see also United States v. McCullough, 150 Fed. Appx. 507, 510 (6th Cir.2005) (applying exception to statements made 'not . . . longer than two-and-a-half hours' after witnessing companion's arrest); United States v. Green, 125 Fed.Appx. 659, 662 (6th Cir.2005) (applying exception to statements made three hours after the startling event); see also United States v. Alexander, 331 F.3d 116, 123 (D.C.Cir.2003) (applying exception to statements made 15 to 20 minutes after the startling event); United States v. Cruz, 156 F.3d 22, 30 (1st Cir.1998) (applying exception to statements made four hours after the startling event); United ...

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