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 Rule 12(f) provides that a district court “may strike from a pleading an insufficient defense or any redundant, immaterial, impertinent, or scandalous matter.” Fed. R. Civ. P. 12(f). “[I]t is settled that [a Rule 12(f)] motion will be denied, unless it can be shown that no evidence in support of the allegation would be admissible.” Lipsky v. Commonwealth United Corp., 551 F.2d 887, 893 (2d Cir. 1976) (citations omitted). Allegations that are “repugnant” or that contain “superfluous descriptions and not substantive elements of the cause of action” also may be stricken. See, e.g., Alvarado-Morales v. Digital Equipment Corp., 843 F.2d 613, 618 (1st Cir. 1988). Indeed, a court has “considerable discretion” in striking an allegation. Delta Consulting Group, Inc. v. R. Randle Constr., Inc., 554 F.3d 1133, 1141 (7th Cir. 2009); see also BJC Health Sys. v. Columbia Cas. Co., 478 F.3d 908, 917 (8th Cir. 2007) (“Judges enjoy liberal discretion to strike pleadings under Rule 12(f).” (citation omitted)). “Striking a party's pleading, however, is an extreme and disfavored measure.” BJC Health Sys., 478 F.3d at 917; see also Waste Mgmt. Holdings v. Gilmore, 252 F.3d 316, 347 (4th Cir. 2001) (“Rule 12(f) motions ...

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