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The Hobb’s Act, 18 U.S.C. § 1951(b)(2), defines 'extortion' as 'the obtaining of property from another, with his consent, induced by wrongful use of actual or threatened force, violence or fear, or under color of official right.' Under the Hobbs Act, 'the term 'extortion' means the obtaining of property from another, with his consent, induced by wrongful use of actual or threatened force, violence, or fear, or under color of official right.' 18 U.S.C. § 1951(b)(2). 


United States v. Culbert, 435 U.S. 371, 377, 55 L. Ed. 2d 349, 98 S. Ct. 1112 (1978) (holding that proof of racketeering was not a separate prerequisite to criminal liability under the Hobbs Act). The purpose of the statute was 'to prevent anyone from obstructing, delaying, or affecting commerce, or the movement of any article or commodity in commerce by robbery or extortion as defined in the bill.' H.R. Rep. No. 238, 79th Cong., 1st Sess., 9 (1945) (emphasis added) (quoted in Culbert, 435 U.S. at 377-78). The statute manifests Congressional intent 'to use all the constitutional power [it had] to punish interference with interstate commerce by extortion, robbery, or physical violence.' Stirone v. United States, 361 ...

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