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This term is used in the civil, nearly in the same sense that the word plea has in the common law. In chancery practice, it is the allegation of a party in writing, that some pleading or proceeding in a cause is insufficient. Exceptions are dilatory or peremptory. Dilatory exceptions are such as do not tend to defeat the action, but only to retard its progress. Declinatory exceptions have this effect, as well as the exception of discussion opposed by a third possessor, or by a surety in an hypothecary action, or the exception taken in order to call in the warrantor. These exceptions must, in general, be pleaded in limine litis before issue joined. A declinatory exception is a species of dilatory exception, which merely declines the jurisdiction of the judge before whom the action is brought. Peremptory exceptions are those which tend to the dismissal of the action.


Some relate to forms, others arise from the law. Those which relate to forms, tend to have the cause dismissed, owing to some nullities in the proceedings. These must be pleaded in limine litis. Peremptory exceptions founded on law, are those which, without going into the merits of ...

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