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n. This is a Latin derivative of to remind, admonish. Under the common law: A reprimand from a judge to a person accused, on being discharged, warning him of the consequences of his conduct, and intimating to him, that should he be guilty of the same fault for which he has been admonished, he will be punished with greater severity. The admonition was authorized by the civil law, as a species of punishment for slight misdemeanors. A judge’s statements to a jury that it must not discuss the case until they are charged. A judge’s statement to the jury regarding their duty to only consider admissible evidence in the determination of guilt. Gentle or friendly reproof; counseling against a fault or error; expression of authoritative advice; friendly caution or warning. 


Syn. - Admonition, Reprehension, Reproof. Admonition is prospective, and relates to moral delinquencies; its object is to prevent further transgression. Reprehension and reproof are retrospective, the former being milder than the latter. A person of any age or station may be liable to reprehension in case of wrong conduct; but reproof is the act of a superior. It is authoritative fault-finding or censure addressed to ...

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