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 The Warrant Clause of the Fourth Amendment protects commercial buildings as well as private homes. The Court has held that warrantless searches are generally unreasonable, and that this rule applies to commercial premises as well as homes. In Camara v. Municipal Court, 387 U. S. 523, 387 U. S. 528-529 (1967) the court held: '[E]xcept in certain carefully defined classes of cases, a search of private property without proper consent is 'unreasonable' unless it has been authorized by a valid search warrant.'

 

On the same day, the court also ruled: 'As we explained in Camara, a search of private houses is presumptively unreasonable if conducted without a warrant. The businessman, like the occupant of a residence, has a constitutional right to go about his business free from unreasonable official entries upon his private commercial property. The businessman, too, has that right placed in jeopardy if the decision to enter and inspect for violation of regulatory laws can be made and enforced by the inspector in the field without official authority evidenced by a warrant.' See v. Seattle, 387 U. S. 541, 387 U. S. 543 (1967).

 

These same cases also held ...

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